Praying Mantis on a Leaf

Approved EO 4 Specification

Pest Management for Outdoor Spaces
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Pest Management for Outdoor Spaces

 

Covered Services and Products

This specification applies to pest management for turf and ornamental plantings, including turf, grounds, trees, shrubs, flowers and other ornamental plantings, and associated parking lots, walkways and other impervious surfaces.

It also covers, but provides different requirements for, pest management on golf courses, land in agricultural production, forests or open space under active habitat management, areas located within a utility or transportation right-of-way, invasive species control, or specifically to address a threat to public health or safety, such as stinging insects or vegetation such as poison ivy, giant hogweed or wild parsnip.

 

Definitions

Integrated Pest Management (“IPM”) is an effective and environmentally sensitive approach to pest management that relies on a combination of common-sense practices. IPM programs use current, comprehensive information on the life cycles of pests and their interaction with the environment. This information, in combination with available pest control methods, is used to manage pest damage by the most economical means, and with the least possible hazard to people, property, and the environment. IPM programs utilize surveillance, monitoring, periodic re-inspection, and interpretation of the resulting data to estimate the nature of a given area’s pest population and make decisions for long-term suppression or prevention. The data gained through monitoring instructs decisions regarding when and where interventions are needed, the type of interventions selected, and the method of application and implementation. IPM programs must extend beyond the application of pesticides to predominantly pursue structural and procedural modifications that establish physical barriers to pests, and reduce the food, water, and harborage available to them.

Integrated Vegetation Management (“IVM”) is an effective and environmentally sensitive approach to outdoor vegetation management that relies on common sense practices.  In order to manage vegetation and the environment, IVM programs generally promote desirable, stable, low-growing plant communities that will resist invasion by tall-growing tree species.  IVM programs are used to manage undesirable plants by the most economical means, and with the least possible hazard to people, property, and the environment.   IVM programs utilize surveillance, monitoring, periodic re-inspection, and interpretation of the resulting data to evaluate a given area’s vegetation and make decisions for long-term suppression or elimination of undesirable plants.  IVM programs use methods which can include a combination of chemical, biological, cultural, mechanical, and/or manual treatments.  IVM programs must extend beyond the application of herbicides to predominantly include environmental and procedural modifications that destroy or compete with undesirable plants.

 

Specifications
  1. Pest Management for Turf and Ornamental Plantings:

Affected state entities shall manage pests on turf and ornamental plants solely through mechanical, sanitary, cultural, or biological means to the maximum extent practicable, recognizing that such methods may result in greater weed or pest populations than are achievable by the use of chemicals. Note: Pesticide use is prohibited on the grounds at schools and day care centers in New York State (for more information, see https://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/41822.html). If an affected state entity finds that chemical means of pest management are necessary as a temporary measure, or to transition to non-chemical practices, or non-chemical means fail to provide adequate control, entities that choose to employ pesticides shall only use those that meet one of the following criteria:

 

A. Any pesticide classified by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an exempt material under Section 40 CFR Part 152.25; Note: For a list of pesticide active and inert ingredients that qualify go to: https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/152.25

B. Pesticides used for the purpose of rodent control in tamper-resistant bait stations or placed directly into rodent burrows or other areas inaccessible to children, pets, or wildlife;

Any biopesticide (a product that uses naturally occurring substances or microorganisms that control pests) registered by the EPA, and also registered by the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).
Note: For a list of biopesticide products registered by DEC go to: 
http://www.dec.ny.gov/nyspad/products?2, click the Advanced Search button, select biopesticide in the Other category, and then click the Search button.

C. Affected entities must adhere to all applicable pesticide notification requirements (see https://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/42920.html), and are encouraged to adhere to the specifications and practices in the document: NOFA Standards for Organic Land Care. NOFA Organic Landcare Committee, November 2017, which can be found at: http://www.organiclandcare.net/

  1. Pest Management for Golf Courses, Rights of Way, and Other Unique Facilities and Situations:

Pest management on golf courses, areas located within a utility or transportation right-of-way, land in agricultural production, forests or open space under active habitat management, invasive species control, or specifically to address a threat to public health or safety, such as stinging insects or vegetation such as poison ivy, giant hogweed or wild parsnip shall use IPM and IVM to the maximum extent practicable.

If an affected state entity finds that chemical means of pest management are necessary, entities that choose to employ pesticides are encouraged to use only those that meet one of the following criteria:

 

A. Any pesticide classified by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an exempt material under Section 40 CFR Part 152.25; Note: For a list of pesticide active and inert ingredients that qualify go to: https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/152.25

B. Pesticides used for the purpose of rodent control in tamper-resistant bait stations or placed directly into rodent burrows or other areas inaccessible to children, pets, or wildlife;

C. Any biopesticide (a product that uses naturally occurring substances or microorganisms that control pests) registered by the EPA, and also registered by the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). Note: For a list of biopesticide products registered by DEC go to: http://www.dec.ny.gov/nyspad/products?2, click the Advanced Search button, select biopesticide in the Other category, and then click the Search button.

Cornell University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences established The New York State Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Program to develop sustainable ways to manage pests and help people to use methods that minimize environmental, health, and economic risks. More information and assistance about Integrated Pest Management can be found at Cornell’s IPM website: https://nysipm.cornell.edu/.

 

  1. Purchase of Nursery Stock:

Affected state entities shall, to the maximum extent practicable, avoid the use of nursery stock treated with insecticides, including neonicotinoids.